THE NEWEST METHOD OF THROWING A BASEBALL IS THE PRICE TECHNIQUE
 

Articles


LOSS OF CONTROL
STEVE BLASS or STEVE SAX DISEASE
MACKEY SASSER SYNDROME, THE LITTLE MAN

(The inability to find the strike zone)

“What is said about those that lose control” 

IMBALANCED - WEAK MIND – STRONG ARM
KILLS CONFIDENCE – INSTILLS FEAR

“Names given for this loss of control problem” 

THE BEAST
THE DEMON
THE CREATURE
THE CURSE
THE CLOVEN-HOOVED BEAST
A BRAIN DISORDER
A MENTAL PROBLEM, SEE A SHRINK


These comments are what others are saying about players that lose the pinpoint control when throwing a baseball   ( coaches, doctors and sports writers )

“All of this information was found on the Internet and in Newspapers.”

Many of these players went on to have surgery trying to cure this disease.  Many had elbow surgery.

SOME PLAYERS THAT THEY SAID TO HAVE BEEN AFFECTED ARE:

RICK ANKIEL, MLB Pitcher walked off the mound March 2005 to move to the OF

STEVE BLASS, MLB Pitcher 64 to 74, ended his career at age 32 for he never recovered
JOHN BURKE
JOE COWLEY, MLB Pitcher 82-87, No hitter one year, lost it the next year, Steve Blass Disease
MIKE IVIE, 71-83, #1 draft pick that switched to 1st base, lost control and move saved him.
William Norman Grigg, 17-year-old catcher that walked away for lack of control
CLAY KIRBY
Clint Courtney, catcher, lost it and after 10 days regained control
CHUCK KNOBLAUCH, MLB golden glove one year, Steve Sax the next.  Moved to OF to try.

SAM MILITELLO

DALE MURPHY, catcher 76-93, moved to the outfield to try to stay on.
Steve Rogers, P
BRUCE RUFFIN
Mike Santoro, Age 20, college catcher that was cured during August 2005
MACKEY SASSER, catcher 87-95, succumbed in 91.
KEVIN SAUCIER, 78-82, never recovered.
STEVE SAX.  2nd base, 81-94, rediscovered success after leaving the Dodgers.
JOHN SMOLTZ, P
STEVE TROUT
BILLY WAGNER, LHP, had TJ surgery and maybe it helped control, he is pitching now, 2005.
MARK WOHLERS, P, had elbow surgery but is still struggling with control.
MITCH “WILD THING” WILLIAMS

**Rick Ankiel  this past week walked away from the mound to try to make it in the outfield.  3/14/05

He had elbow surgery a year or so ago and still can’t find the strike zone.

Being out of the natural throwing groove when throwing or pitching a baseball causes loss of control and causes all injuries to the arm, shoulder and elbow.

MLB is wrong when they say stress, pain, soreness and injuries are normal when throwing or pitching a baseball.  They also say that overuse causes soreness and injuries.  Wrong again.

When a player is in his natural throwing groove he will be able to throw or pitch all day without stress, pain or soreness and he will throw with greater velocity and control.

Even a little soreness after throwing, pain, or being tired in the arm or having a dead arm is an indication that the player is out of his natural throwing groove.  Inability to throw strikes and loss of velocity is another indication that a player is out of his natural throwing groove.  After throwing for an extended period of time, your body may be tired but not your throwing arm.  When a player knows how to get to his natural throwing groove, he will regain the confidence and consistency on the mound again.  No more slumps.

Stress, pain and injuries to the shoulder including the rotator cuff and upper arm are caused by one error in the delivery. (Including the broken humerus).   Stress, pain and injuries to the lower biceps, triceps, forearm and elbow is caused by another error in the delivery. The arm being dead or tired after throwing or pitching is caused by the same error in a player’s mechanics.  Stress or injury to the oblique muscles is caused by a combination of these two errors in the delivery.

I am corresponding with four young pitchers today (3/14/05) that broke their humerus while pitching in a baseball game.  I have found about fourteen others in the papers and on the Internet that have broken their humerus while pitching a baseball.  This is caused by an error in their delivery and can be corrected.  Tony Saunders is trying to make a come back with the Baltimore Orioles after breaking his humerus two different times while pitching.

Over this same thirty-year period, I have worked with nearly three hundred baseball players that had problems throwing a baseball and some had already had surgery on their arm, shoulder or elbow.  Finding your natural throwing groove can be done even after extensive surgery or injuries.  Fear of re-injury can be a problem during rehabilitation if you do not know what caused the injury.

For thirty years I have worked with players that had soreness, pain, injuries, velocity and control problems.  These young men I had never coached and they were from all levels of baseball, including major-league players.  Most major league and college players do not want their coaches or managers to know that they are having problems for it may hurt their contract dealings in the future.

 More pitchers are having problems for they throw so many more times and have to throw hard.  The legs have seven times the power that the arms have. We throw from our legs and a small error in your mechanics can cause major soreness and injuries in the arm, shoulder or elbow.  Many injuries occur on the first pitch in a game.  This rules out the overuse theory of MLB.  Check the record books of old.  Check Cy Young and Walter Johnson’s records, innings pitched, games won, complete games and era.